Our History curriculum

Our History curriculum is designed to inspire our children to want to know more about the past and to think and act as historians.

Our progression document ensures that children gain the necessary skills to investigate and interpret the past.  We enable children to understand chronology, to build and overview of Britain's past - as well as that of the wider world - and to develop the ability to communicate historically.

School visits, themed days and the use of drama ensure that the children take part in memorable learning experiences.

 

Assemblies and other videos:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZCf0l0vMLVUclSJA2vfwTQ/videos

 

Useful websites 

https://www.history.org.uk/

https://www.natgeokids.com/uk/category/discover/history/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zcw76sg

 

National Curriculum

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/239035/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_History.pdf

 

History Progression

 

 

Chronology

 

Historical Knowledge

 

Historical Concepts

 

Organising, evaluating and communicating informationi

 

Understanding the world: People and Communities

 

30-50 months - remember and talk about significant events in their own experience.

Early Learning Goal

Talk about past and present events in their own lives and in the lives of family members.

 

 

Characteristics of Effective Learning

Find out and explore.

Show curiosity about objects, events and people.

Understanding the world: People and Communities

30-50 months - show interest in the lives of people who are familiar to them.

Show interest in different occupations and ways of life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Characteristics of Effective Learning

Engage in open ended activity.

Show particular interest. 

Show high levels of energy, fascination.

Paying attention to details.

Be willing to 'have a go'.

Seek challenge

Take a risk, engage in new experiences, and learn by trial and error.

Show a belief that more effort or a different approach will pay off.

Think of ideas.

Find ways to solve problems.

Make links and notice patterns in their experience.

Develop ideas of cause and effect.

Plan, make decisions about how to approach a task, solve a problem and reach a goal.

Understanding the world: People and Communities

30-50 months - Know some of the things that make them unique, and can talk about some of the similarities and differences in relation to friends or family. 

Early Learning Goal

Know that other children don't always enjoy the same things, and are sensitive to this.

Know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions.

 

 

Characteristics of Effective Learning

Take on a role in their play.

Act out experiences with other people.

Understanding the world: People and Communities

30-50 months - recognise and describe special times or events for family and friends.

 

 

 

Chronology

 

Historical Knowledge

 

Historical Concepts

 

Organising, evaluating and communicating information

 

Sequence events or objects, within their own experience, in chronological order.

Begin to use appropriate terminology such as then and now, old and new, yesterday and today.

 

Describe similarities and differences between past and present in their own lives and other people's lives, using the terms 'then and now'.

Begin to identify and recount some details about significant events or people from the past using pictures and stories.

 

Find answers to simple questions about the past by using source material.

Discover about the past through role play and drama.

 

Write simple sentences to describe an event or period of time.

Show knowledge and understanding of the past in different ways: role play, drama, drawing, talking.

Create timelines with objects and pictures.

 

Neil Armstrong and the first moon landing.

Toys past and present.

 

Chronology

 

Historical Knowledge

 

 

Historical Concepts

 

Organising, evaluating and communicating information.

 

Sequence a small number of artefacts, events or images from different periods of their own life and from other periods in the past.

Recognise that dates are used to identify when events happened in the past.

Use vocabulary related to time such as past, present, year(s), ago, before, after.

 

Describe similarities and differences between artefacts, people and events from the present day and other periods studied.

Begin to use evidence to explain why changes occurred or why people acted as they did in the past.

Use drama to develop empathy and understanding.

 

Draw simple conclusions and deduce information on the past from different sources.

Understand and explain the consequences of an event or action in the past.

Begin to ask questions about source material.

 

Describe an event or period in the past by writing simple recounts and stories, using temporal markers to show structure.

 

Connect ideas and use simple phrases to explain why an event occurred.

 

Important women (Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole)

The Great Fire of London

 

Chrolology

 

Historical Knowledge

 

Historical Concepts

 

Organising, evaluating and communicating information

 

Use timelines to place the current period studied in relation to previously taught periods.

Sequence events and artefacts.

Use vocabulary related to dates such as century, decade.

Begin to understand that timelines can be divided into BCE and CE.

 

Identify some details about the houses and settlements, culture and way of life and beliefs and attitudes of people in different time periods.

Use evidence to find out how any of these may have changed during the period studied.

 

 

Use a range of source material including visits to collate information about the past.

Give reasons for, and results of, main events and changes.

Look at two different versions of the same event and identify differences in the accounts.

 

Present finding about the past using speaking, writing, drawing and ICT skills.

Use dates and vocabulary relating to the topic accurately.

Identify some of the different ways in which the past is represented.

Manchester in the Second World War

The Anglo Saxons and the Vikings

 

Chronology

 

Historical Knowledge

 

Historical concepts

 

Organising, evaluating and communicating information

 

Place current period of study on a timeline together with previously taught periods, showing an understanding of BCE and CE.

Name and place dates of significant events of the period on a timeline.

Use the following vocabulary:

BCE (Before the  common Era) linked to BS (Before Christ), CE (Common Era) linked to AD (Anno Domini - in the year of the Lord), decade, century, period, ancient civilisations and topic related vocabulary which denotes the period.

 

Explore key events and identify key features of the period studied.

Identify some ideas, beliefs and attitudes of the period studied.

Describe how some of the past events have influenced life today.

 

Explore the evidence available and why (only) this evidence is available. Build understanding over the year of the difference between primary and secondary sources.

Begin to evaluate the usefulness of different sources.

Use evidence to build up a picture of the key events/ features of the period.

Choose relevant material to build up a picture of one aspect of life in the time studied. Ask questins of the source material and suggest sources of evidence from a selection provided to help answer questions.

Suggest reasons why there may be different accounts of history.

Guided use of text books and e-learning to develop historical knowledge.

 

Present findings about the past using speaking, writing, maths (data handling), ICT, drama and drawing skills.

Use dates and subject specific vocabulary including words (such as monarch, settlement, invader) accurately.

Ancient Egypt

Early Islamic Civilisation, including a study of Baghdad

 

Chronology

 

Historical Knowledge

 

Historical Concepts

 

Organising, evaluating and communicating information

 

Place current period of study on a timeline together with previously taught periods, showing a solid understanding of BCE and CE.

Name and place dates of significant events of the period on a timeline.

Identify changes within current historical period of study.

Relate current study to previous studies and make comparisons between different periods in history.

Use vocabulary linked to specific periods (IDENTIFY EXAMPLES HERE), as well as topic related vocabulary which denotes the period.

 

Explore key events and identify key features of the period studied.

Give short term cause and consequence (inc. impact on the people) of the main events, situations and changes in the period studied.

Identify changes and links within the time period studied.

Explore aspects of life for different groups of people and draw comparisons (i.e. men and women, rich and poor, slaves and free men). compare the lives of those of the period to the lives of those during other periods studied.

Compare an aspect of life in an an ancient civilisation to the same aspect of life in later times.

 

Explore the evidence available and why (only) this evidence is available. Use evidence to build up a picture of the key events/ features of the period.

Identify and explore primary and secondary sources.

Question the reliability of source material and give reasons why something is or is not reliable.

Realise that there is often not a single answer to historical questions. Compare accounts of events from different sources and identify reasons why there may be different accounts.

Know that people can represent events or ideas in ways that persuade others - bias and propaganda.

Select relevant sections of information within text books and e-learning with greater independence.

 

Present detailed findings giving reference to evidence and historical skills.

Use dates and growing subject specific vocabulary accurately.

The Ancient Greeks

Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron age

Crime and Punishment from 1066 to the present day

 

Chronology

 

Historical Knowledge

 

Historical Concepts

 

Organising, evaluating, and communicating information

 

Place current period of study on a timeline together with previously taught periods, as well as other periods/ events/ cultural movements from around the world that the children are aware of (i.e. learnt in wider reading)

Use timelines to excplore changes and/ or developments in a key area (i.e. culture - inc. art/technology - inc. transport/religion).

Use vocabulary linked to movements or times of change (i.e. Industrial Revolution, Renaissance, Cold War) as well as topic related vocabulary which denotes the period.

 

Explore key events and identify key features of the period studied.

Using and referring to sources of evidence, describe aspects of life, people's beliefs and attitudes and differences in status.

compare the above to other periods studied.

Identify how aspects of life changed during period studied, giving reasons why and referring to evidence.

Describe how key events, developments and/or changes impacted both on subsequent periods and in the long term, on today's society.

 

Link sources of information.

Evaluate the usefulness and accuracy of different sources, continuing to develop an understanding the role of propaganda, bias, misinformation and opinion. Be aware that different evidence can lead to different conclusions.

Form own opinions about historical events from a range of sources.

Select the most appropriate and useful source material (inc. both primary and secondary) material for a particular task.

 

Present information in an organised and clearly structured way and in the most effective/appropriate manneer (e.g. written explanation, tables and charts, labelled diagram). their recording reflects the skill/s being taught.

Use dates and growing subject specific vocabulary accurately.

The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain